Spring Intensive :: PITCH SPEED DATING

What is Pitch Speed Dating? When 50 writers and 6 editors and agents try to make a connection. We lined up after breakfast (I’ll save you the three paragraph description of the scrambled eggs) for a five minute chance to get an industry professional excited about our latest story.

The one-on-one time is the goal of our entire Spring Intensive. Many writers came away with requests, referrals, and revision ideas.

Spring Intensive :: PITCH SPEED DATING

What is Pitch Speed Dating? When 50 writers and 6 editors and agents try to make a connection. We lined up after breakfast (I’ll save you the three paragraph description of the scrambled eggs) for a five minute chance to get an industry professional excited about our latest story.

The one-on-one time is the goal of our entire Spring Intensive. Many writers came away with requests, referrals, and revision ideas.

Spring Intensive :: STORYBOARDING YOUR CAREER WITH SUSAN LUTE

Author Susan Lute offered a chance for our writers to have fun with career planning. With the help of magazines, glue sticks, and scrapbooking acoutrements, we found imagies and quotes of where we want our career path to lead.

Lynda Aicher brought her board from last year, and shared that much of it had come to fruition. Can’t wait to see what happens next year with these boards!

Spring Intensive :: STORYBOARDING YOUR CAREER WITH SUSAN LUTE

Author Susan Lute offered a chance for our writers to have fun with career planning. With the help of magazines, glue sticks, and scrapbooking acoutrements, we found imagies and quotes of where we want our career path to lead.

Lynda Aicher brought her board from last year, and shared that much of it had come to fruition. Can’t wait to see what happens next year with these boards!

Spring Intensive :: LIZ PELLETIER

Entangled publisher Liz Pelletier let us in on what goes on as a book moves through a publishing house and onto the bookshelves.

The path to a published book ::

1.       Query letter. This is the basis for the blurb for most publishers. Make sure it will sell the book. Include a positioning statement on your story might be marketed, a high concept that will help your editor. Readers of SEP will love this heartwarming sexy contemporary. (facebook followers, twitter, platform, tribe, served on boards, memberships)

2.       Editor makes the request to see more. When it comes it, it is sent to two interns (Entangled has 45). Interns read and writes a letter explaining yes or no. Two no means a no, a split vote gets a 3rd intern, two yes means it gets sent to the editor to read. The intern summary lists five things they love and five things that need work. From that, editors can gauge how long it will take to fix it. Sometimes, an agent will get an editor excited about it and the book might skip the interns.

3.       Acquisitions form where editors have to present to the board (which includes marketing and finance) with 5 swaying reasons why they want to buy your book. (platform, marketing, multi-published)The more you can put in your query to help the editor pitch it in the meeting, the more likely your story will be contracted.

4.       Key titles – every season a few books are selected and the majority of the marketing effort for a publisher goes into those titles. The books that are thought to sell the most.  

5.       Cover  – the cover should sell the book not represent it. It is just packaging.

6.       Distribution catalog – someone in production has to pitch it to the sales force. 43 sales people, 13 directors, 60 seconds per title to make them think this is the hottest title ever. Then marketing has 60 seconds to work that angle with promotion (sales, book tour, advertising, etc). They call out numbers…B&N, Booksamillion, Airports, big box, amazon, grocery…or they ‘skip’. This gives a general sense of the print run.

7.       Co-op. Table space, faced out, new release shelf and end caps. Publishers pay for the space at the front of the store to build interest. Publishers have to be nominated by the distributor, and then the book store decides who they would like to feature. There is a lot of money involved in getting your book positioned in the book store.

Our industry peeps really enjoyed sitting in the back of the workshop
When writing your query, and writing your book, look at it as a business.

We can release fast enough to ride a trend, but mostly you make your own trends. Like aliens in high school…maybe hackers will be next.

Spring Intensive :: LIZ PELLETIER

Entangled publisher Liz Pelletier let us in on what goes on as a book moves through a publishing house and onto the bookshelves.

The path to a published book ::

1.       Query letter. This is the basis for the blurb for most publishers. Make sure it will sell the book. Include a positioning statement on your story might be marketed, a high concept that will help your editor. Readers of SEP will love this heartwarming sexy contemporary. (facebook followers, twitter, platform, tribe, served on boards, memberships)

2.       Editor makes the request to see more. When it comes it, it is sent to two interns (Entangled has 45). Interns read and writes a letter explaining yes or no. Two no means a no, a split vote gets a 3rd intern, two yes means it gets sent to the editor to read. The intern summary lists five things they love and five things that need work. From that, editors can gauge how long it will take to fix it. Sometimes, an agent will get an editor excited about it and the book might skip the interns.

3.       Acquisitions form where editors have to present to the board (which includes marketing and finance) with 5 swaying reasons why they want to buy your book. (platform, marketing, multi-published)The more you can put in your query to help the editor pitch it in the meeting, the more likely your story will be contracted.

4.       Key titles – every season a few books are selected and the majority of the marketing effort for a publisher goes into those titles. The books that are thought to sell the most.  

5.       Cover  – the cover should sell the book not represent it. It is just packaging.

6.       Distribution catalog – someone in production has to pitch it to the sales force. 43 sales people, 13 directors, 60 seconds per title to make them think this is the hottest title ever. Then marketing has 60 seconds to work that angle with promotion (sales, book tour, advertising, etc). They call out numbers…B&N, Booksamillion, Airports, big box, amazon, grocery…or they ‘skip’. This gives a general sense of the print run.

7.       Co-op. Table space, faced out, new release shelf and end caps. Publishers pay for the space at the front of the store to build interest. Publishers have to be nominated by the distributor, and then the book store decides who they would like to feature. There is a lot of money involved in getting your book positioned in the book store.

Our industry peeps really enjoyed sitting in the back of the workshop
When writing your query, and writing your book, look at it as a business.

We can release fast enough to ride a trend, but mostly you make your own trends. Like aliens in high school…maybe hackers will be next.

Jan’s Paperbacks Website Launch Party

A collection of Northwest authors – including some of our Roses – came to celebrate the new website for local bookseller Jan’s Paperbacks. We schmoozed with readers and authors from other genres and of course one another.

The desserts were the highlight of the night, including Delilah Marvelle’s infamous exploding cake. Her hubby had the task of cutting the cake without turning it into a mess of mush. The man has skills!

Best of luck to Jan’s Paperbacks on this new venture.

Jan’s Paperbacks Website Launch Party

A collection of Northwest authors – including some of our Roses – came to celebrate the new website for local bookseller Jan’s Paperbacks. We schmoozed with readers and authors from other genres and of course one another.

The desserts were the highlight of the night, including Delilah Marvelle’s infamous exploding cake. Her hubby had the task of cutting the cake without turning it into a mess of mush. The man has skills!

Best of luck to Jan’s Paperbacks on this new venture.

The New Era of Publishing – Making it Work For You! with April Eberhardt

After the official passing of the gavel from one chapter president to the next, and the presentation of our thank you gift for our three-year presidential veteran, it was time to get down to business with the workshop.

Our chapter had a special guest this month, literary agent April Eberhardt. She came to share her thoughts on the future of publishing and what writers need to know before considering self-publishing.

***

Risk aversion in traditional publishing opened the door for independent and self publishing. They are looking for ways to stay relevant, including new electronic publishing divisions. The bigger the publisher, the more bureaucracy, the harder it is for them to be flexible.

Where there is change, there is opportunity. An author’s ability to choose how to be published has given authors more power in the business. 

Discoverability should be the biggest concern to all authors. You are up against daunting competition. Promote yourself.

Emerging to models of publishing provides different ways for writers and readers to connect. Blog, comment on blogs, get involved in the underground conversation.

Traditional publishing offered you and advance, and they took care of the expenses of publishing the book. In the new models there is an investment component, authors are being expected to shoulder some of the burden of expenses and marketing.

Whatever you choose to do today, you don’t have to do tomorrow.
5 Must Dos for Self-published Authors
1.       Make sure your story is good. Start with an engaging top-notch story.  Have a good, fast start.
2.       Edit. If you can, hire a good freelance editor.  Trade editing with another author.
3.       Create and alluring cover. Think brand identity and allure.
4.       Exercise your marketing skills – create awareness. Discoverability. Social media. Blogs, Review sites. Goodreads.  Call in your favors.
5.       Let go of the idea that only traditionally published books are real. The perception of self-published books is changing.


If you are going to self-publish, you have to do it right.

The New Era of Publishing – Making it Work For You! with April Eberhardt

After the official passing of the gavel from one chapter president to the next, and the presentation of our thank you gift for our three-year presidential veteran, it was time to get down to business with the workshop.

Our chapter had a special guest this month, literary agent April Eberhardt. She came to share her thoughts on the future of publishing and what writers need to know before considering self-publishing.

***

Risk aversion in traditional publishing opened the door for independent and self publishing. They are looking for ways to stay relevant, including new electronic publishing divisions. The bigger the publisher, the more bureaucracy, the harder it is for them to be flexible.

Where there is change, there is opportunity. An author’s ability to choose how to be published has given authors more power in the business. 

Discoverability should be the biggest concern to all authors. You are up against daunting competition. Promote yourself.

Emerging to models of publishing provides different ways for writers and readers to connect. Blog, comment on blogs, get involved in the underground conversation.

Traditional publishing offered you and advance, and they took care of the expenses of publishing the book. In the new models there is an investment component, authors are being expected to shoulder some of the burden of expenses and marketing.

Whatever you choose to do today, you don’t have to do tomorrow.
5 Must Dos for Self-published Authors
1.       Make sure your story is good. Start with an engaging top-notch story.  Have a good, fast start.
2.       Edit. If you can, hire a good freelance editor.  Trade editing with another author.
3.       Create and alluring cover. Think brand identity and allure.
4.       Exercise your marketing skills – create awareness. Discoverability. Social media. Blogs, Review sites. Goodreads.  Call in your favors.
5.       Let go of the idea that only traditionally published books are real. The perception of self-published books is changing.


If you are going to self-publish, you have to do it right.